Category Archives: Advice

Spring Cleaning for the Family Historian

 

Whitman Family History Pictures from Oklahoma 045Whitman Family History Pictures from Oklahoma 045Whitman Family History Pictures from Oklahoma 045

Whitman Family History Pictures from Oklahoma 045Whitman Family History Pictures from Oklahoma 045We are the keepers of the record, the protectors of family photos, and the font of all family lore: We are the record keepers. The “Chief Memory Officers.” And we keep a lot of stuff in our quest for preserving our histories.  Cleaning and organizing all those papers, photos, and memorabilia is a big job. Here are some little ideas that might make for a big difference this Spring:

  1. Get the boxes out of the attic/basement.  Papers and photos need to live where you live – free of moisture and humidity.  While doing your normal spring cleaning, designate some newly cleaned space for your genealogical information.
  2. Organize in baby steps.  Too many boxes?  Try setting aside time to go through a box, but only to take out information for one family (not a whole surname, it is easier to file papers and memorabilia by couple or individual).  Take out the pages just for Uncle Jehoshaphat Blank and his wife Aunt Jemina (Someone) Blank.  Go through them and see if any thing needs to be a) scanned and uploaded to your online family tree, b) used for future research and put in your research log, or c) thrown away because you have duplicates of the same 1820 census.   Take them and simply put them in a labeled file folder in a dedicated filing cabinet.  Then repeat with the next couple.  Maybe put on some classic 1940s or even early jazz albums to get you in the mood while you shuffle through that box.
  3. Learn about photo preservation for your originals.  You don’t need to scrapbook them (yet), but you may avoid future damage by putting them in a safer environment (rather than that ziplock bag or sticky album). There are some great how-to articles online, try NARA’s article on removing photos from sticky albums or About.com’s section on Preserving the Past.
  4. Get help.  Genealogy is about family, so why not make organizing your family history a family affair?  Plan an organizing-get-to-know-our-ancestors party with your cousins, children, or grandchildren.
  5. Make a date.  Cleaning and organizing can be overwhelming.  Plan and calendar when you will organize in the next month.  Can you spare an hour once a week?  Two hours a month?  A little progress is still progress, and you may find that you are enjoying your hands-on family history much more than you thought.

I can’t promise that organizing will be easy, but it will always be worth it.  How many times have I found something I didn’t realize I had, or more often I find something I forgot I had but that now has new significance in light of the research I’ve recently done.  A little time here and there goes a long way.

Local Historical and Genealogical Societies: Valuable Resources for Any Researcher

hist soc

 

Have you been stumped with a research project, especially because the area your ancestor lived in was a mystery to you?  Needed a genealogical buddy to bounce ideas off of?  Discover the local historical societies in your ancestor’s area, and find friends and inspiration at a genealogical society in your home county. Let’s look at a few things each could be valuable for.

HISTORICAL SOCIETIES

Unless you have lived in the same area for six generations, you may not know much about the place where your ancestor lived and raised his family.  Knowing about small cemeteries, churches in the area, and the general history can help in your research. Often these historical societies are run or staffed by volunteers, and we appreciate all the time they put into restoring the history of their area.  It is always a great idea to contact historical societies in your ancestor’s area, either by phone or through their websites.  For example here are some unique records I’ve found in historical societies:

  • Private indexes of obituary records
  • Private indexes of newspaper records
  • Books on local churches
  • Cemetery indexes
  • Historic maps
  • Journals and diaries of early local citizens
  • Photographs
  • School records
  • Business records
  • Early court records (from the 1700s) thrown away by the courthouse and retrieved by the historical society staff
  • Family surname indexes
  • Donated family histories and family files
  • Newsletters about the area’s history and records
  • …and so much more!

YOUR LOCAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

Do you have family who just don’t understand your need to learn more about the family tree?  Need a friend who won’t roll their eyes at your story of finding the right headstone at the cemetery?  Join a local county genealogical society.  These are also staffed by volunteers, dedicated to the preservation of family histories.  You don’t have to have ancestors from your local area to  join a local genealogical society – its about coming together and collaborative learning.  Many genealogical societies meet regularly or volunteer in projects like these:

  • Sponsoring lectures in genealogical or historical subjects
  • Collecting and indexing records for publication
  • Discussing research problems
  • Cleaning or maintaining local cemeteries or historic sites
  • Sharing information about genealogical educational opportunities both online and in the area
  • Planning trips to significant historical sites or archives.

Take some time to visit the website for the historical society in your ancestor’s area or find out the meeting times of the genealogical society in your local area.  You’ll be glad you did.  You’d be surprised how much you can learn!

 

 

 

RT’s Head Genealogist, full of useful advice

Genealogy podcast

Reel Tributes’ Head Genealogist, Rebecca Whitman Koford, was recently a Featured Guest on The Genealogy Professional Podcast.

One terrific piece of advice:  “Enjoy the journey.”

You can listen to the full interview here: http://www.TheGenealogyProfessional.com/rebecca-koford

Enjoy!

Storytelling That Matters @RootsTech: Unlock Your Superpowers

We are all amazing storytellers. And our talents can be extraordinary gifts to the people we love.

No one knows this better than Reel Tributes CEO David Adelman, whose passion for family history was ignited by the touching story his mother told about his grandmother’s life through film.

David recently headlined a RootsTech event on “Storytelling Superpowers: How to Come Off as Your Family’s Genealogy Hero.”

His message was transformational. Genealogists are not just passionate hobbyists, but also the superheroes of their families. Their powers are unseen yet extraordinary as they work behind-the-scenes to create the narratives that bind families together. He urged aspiring family historians to use their storytelling superpowers for the greater good… starting right now.

“It’s the stories, not the data that people will remember.”

Get inspired! Click here to watch the speech:

New Year’s Resolution: Back up Your Genealogical Data

One of the hardest things to face is a computer crash or other catastrophe that deletes all of the genealogical information you have saved on your home computer.  Genealogical databases, stories, digitized photos and documents, research logs, and proof arguments – all gone.

We should be backing up our information often, even monthly, but if you haven’t secured your information in some time, now is the time to do so, and to make a plan for regular backups this year.

You should plan to have copies of your most important family data both in your home, in case of a computer crash, and off-site, in case of fire in the home.  Backing up your data can be done in many ways.  You should pick the ones that best suit your needs.  Some ideas for backing up data are:

  • Re-writable CDs or flash-drives.  Copy your information onto a disc or flash-drive and label it by the date saved.  Check that the CD or flash-drive is capable of handling all the data you wish to save.  Store it in a safe place.  You may consider making a second copy and sending it to a family member to keep.
  • Upgrade your saved data to current software.  Do you have old floppy discs?  Can your current computer read those anymore? Probably not.  If your information is on a CD your computer can read, is the software out of date?  I know I have old Word Documents that won’t open any longer.  This is one of the reasons your data needs to be updated regularly – saving the data is no good if you can no longer access it.
  • Email Yourself.  One of the simplest ways to store small amounts of data is to attach the data in an email to yourself.  Unless your email account clears itself regularly, the data should be accessible for quite some time.  If you use genealogical software, it is easiest to email yourself a copy of the Gedcom file from your genealogical software.  You might email it to a family member as well, in case your email is inaccessible.
  • In the Cloud.  Many sites online offer private accounts where your data can be saved on the internet, and accessible anywhere you can get internet service.  Sites like DropBox  and JustCloud offer limited data storage space for free or for low monthly rates. More storage is available for higher fees.  Compare sites and ask friends about what they like and decide which may be best for you.
  • Dedicated Genealogical Websites.  Many sites like Ancestry.com and FamilySearch FamilyTree offer buildable online family trees. Some may cost you a yearly fee, others may be free.  To use these to best advantage, make sure you are sourcing all of your facts with citations and documenting all your attachments and photos.
  • Ask for Help.  Many of us are great researchers, but not so great at computers.  Saving data or investigating cloud sites just sounds like more than we can handle, but we do understand the importance of backing up our information.  Ask for help, you may have friends or family members who can help with the technical end of information storage while you concentrate on the research.

Start the year off by breathing a sigh of relief that your data is safer than it was last year.  Schedule regular back-up dates throughout the year, and when that fateful “blue screen of death” comes to your computer, you’ll be ready.  Happy New Year!