Category Archives: Giving back

Give Thanks, Give Back

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At this holiday season, no matter what celebrations your are enjoying, you’re probably thinking about giving to others.  Our genealogical community is no different, in fact, the future of genealogy runs on the feet of its volunteers and donations.  Whether you can give a little or a lot, there are so many opportunities to serve.  Here are just a few:

Donate your time online.  Many websites need volunteers to work from home.  Consider giving a few minutes a day or hours a week to any of these worthy causes:

  • FamilySearch Indexing.  Help index millions of records which will then become available and word-searchable for free through the FamilySearch website.  You can choose difficulty levels from beginner to advanced.  If you are bilingual, there are records to index in many foreign languages.  The tutorials are helpful, and the simple program is downloadable from the website.
  • USGenWeb.  Volunteers are needed to adopt counties from all states in the U.S.  You might help manage the website or just index records for that county to make them available to others for free online.
  • FindAGrave and BillionGraves.  Help others find their ancestors’ final resting places by photographing their headstones and adding information about the ancestor if you can.  BillionGraves even has a app for your cell phone to allow you to attach GPS coordinates to the monument, which can be helpful when it comes to some of these enormous cemeteries.

Donate your time in person.  There is something truly rewarding about that face-to-face personal contact between family history enthusiasts.  We feed off each other’s energy, and more importantly, learn so much by working together.

  • Local historical and genealogical societies.  It is a sad fact that many of our local historical and genealogical societies are slowly dying for want of volunteers.  One of my favorite genealogical societies in Maryland has recently disbanded because not enough people were willing to help manage its functions.  Offer to help, if even once a month, and make a difference.
  • Local LDS Family History Centers.  You don’t have to be a member of the church to volunteer in these wonderful facilities.  You don’t have to be very experienced in genealogy either.  You just have to be willing to learn and help keep these local centers staffed.  In the process you’ll be interacting with other experienced family historians and have access to free websites that will only increase your knowledge.  Walk into your local center and volunteer today.

Donate financially.  Without private or corporate sponsors, the resources we use for finding our ancestors’ records will slowly dwindle and fade away. Every dollar counts.  Most contributions to genealogical projects are tax-deductible so this is definitely the time of year to take advantage of those benefits.  While not all of the places needing your financial help are listed below, here are some that you may not know about or can give you an idea of places to go.

  • #GivingTuesday.  After the rush of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, there is Giving Tuesday.  Choose from thousands of worthy causes, many of them genealogical or historical.  I love the idea of finding a cause you didn’t know you could support.
  • Local State Archives, County Archives, or State Genealogical Societies. Consider giving locally.  No matter how much we volunteer, some projects just cost money.  Your state or county may need help. In my home state, The Maryland Genealogical Society, for example, has many indexing and digitization projects that require volunteers.
  • War of 1812 Preserve the Pensions Project.  This one’s my favorite. Military pensions are one of the few record types where you could find the genealogical mother-load of information, especially for your ancestor’s vital birth, marriage, and death dates and relationships as well.  Supporting our patriots never gets old.  This one has a bonus for financial donations, every dollar you give is matched by Ancestry.com, allowing the project to digitize even more of the valuable records.  Whether you donate or not, the images of the soldiers’ pensions are available to everyone for free online at fold3.

Give a little or give a lot, you will undoubtedly get back what you give.  Who can really put a price on how generosity feels?   Did we miss your favorite place to donate time or money?  Tell us about it and share why you love it.  And from us to you, Happy Thanksgiving.

Scary Superstitions

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With Halloween approaching, it got me thinking about death. I’m probably not alone. Have you ever wondered why a woman wears black while in mourning?  Or why people stopped the clocks after a family member died?  Or what the different symbols mean in cemetery art?  Or how your ancestors mourned the passing of their friends and family?

Death is a part of our lives, but had much more of a presence in the lives of our ancestors when we consider mortality rates and the shorter life-spans of some of our earlier relatives.   To better understand our ancestors, and the culture of death they lived with, try a few of these little genealogical exercises.  We may end up exorcising our own ignorance about death and funeral traditions among our dearly departed:

Read.  Some of my favorites at this time of year are –

Surf the Web.  Lots of information is available online, here’s some to get you started –

Experience:  Get out and have some spooky fun, or help make records more available for others –

  • Take photos of headstones at a local cemetery and upload them at FindaGrave.com or Interment.net
  • I am my own great-grandmother?  If you’ve got the time and are making a costume, how about a little genealogical cosplay?  Make a historical costume based on an ancestor’s time or heritage.
  • Rescue a cemetery.  So many cemeteries in our communities are being lost to neglect and swallowed up by nature.  It will take time and organization, but you may want to get together with a local historical or genealogical group to clean up a “forgotten” cemetery.

Remember.  As always, a ghost story is fun, but a life story is what genealogy and family history is all about.  Find a way to remember your ancestors in scrapbooks, narratives, or video.  Just remember and appreciate.

Using FamilySearch

 

Today we’re bringing you a short introduction to some of the amazing contributions FamilySearch is making to the genealogical community online.  There are online tutorials available, but let’s first whet your appetite for this amazing research tool.

How can Family Search to help me? The Family History Library in Salt Lake is full of microfilms.  These microfilms represent filmed records from all over the world, including such things as birth records, court papers, marriages, family books, land records, and much more.  These microfilm are available and can be requested to be sent to a local Family History Center (FHC) for a nominal cost. Using these microfilms enables the researcher to broaden his or her research without too much travel.  The FamilySearch website is now putting many of these microfilms online for free, and a great number of those are linked to a search engine for faster access.

When I click the Search button what am I looking at? This first page is your access into digitized records.  You need to register first to be able to see any of the records, but it’s free.  Let’s discuss what you can do from here.

There are three distinct ways to research in FamilySearch:

  1. Search Engine.  Try entering name, dates, and location for an ancestor you are researching in the fields given at the top of the page.  Your next page will be a list of hits for that search, with closest matches listed at the top.  To look for a specific type of record, scroll down and click “Collections” in the box on the left.  This will open a smaller box with types of records hit for this search such as vital records or censuses.  These search hits represent only those microfilms which have been indexed and inputted into the search engine.  Be warned that not every microfilm or even every digitally reproduced microfilm is represented in the search engine.  FamilySearch invites volunteers to help index their digital records to make them even more accessible online through their indexing program.  When you open a hit, often it leads to an index page.  Towards the bottom of the page is a film number that the record was indexed from.  Take down this number and check the catalog to see if it is digitized, but browsable only, or available to order and send to the local FHC.
  2. Browse.  Many of the digitized microfilms are not represented yet in the search engine, but are online.  Think of these like using a microfilm on a traditional reader, but in the comfort of your own home.  From the search page, scroll down to the section “Browse by Location.”  This represents all the digitized films, but when you click on a place, you will see either a number (the number of records in this group) or the words “Browse Images.”  When you click on this it will either take you to a second page to narrow your search to a more specific location/record type or straight to the first page of the microfilm.
  3. Catalog.  If the record type you want is not in the digitized collection, check the online catalog to see if it has been microfilmed.  Remember that not everything you need has been microfilmed, but the FamilySearch staff does continue to search out records and ask permission to film new ones all the time.  A current project includes FamilySearch staff and volunteers who are working with the National Archives to digitize Civil War pensions.  To search the catalog, use a place name where your ancestor lived, and check the record types that come up.  If you found a film number from a hit off the search engine, enter it from this page as well.

You might also explore other tools from FamilySearch, such as the FamilySearch Wiki, Learning Center, Research Assistance, and more.  Technology today has made so much available to genealogists, and we appreciate all those groups who contribute their time and talents to helping us find our families.  Let us know what you’ve discovered to tell your family’s story!

 

 

Using Family History Centers

One of the things the LDS Church (Mormon) is often known for is the strong interest in genealogy.  The Church’s contributions to the preservation of innumerable historical documents has helped the genealogical community for decades.  I am often surprised, then, when I talk to baby genealogists who have never stepped into an LDS Family History Center (FHC).  If you have not visited your local center, let me give you a few reasons to make a visit a priority in your search for your ancestral kin…

1.  A Wealth of Microfilms.  Some of the first preservation of records across the world was conducted by LDS genealogists under the original direction of the Genealogical Society of Utah.  They photographed old court records, church books, and more onto microfilm.  FamilySearch, a non-profit arm of the LDS church maintains these records on and offline.  They now work at an astounding rate to digitize and index these microfilms and make them available online.  Using FamilySearch online will be our next post.  Not all microfilms are online, but are still available to order and have sent to your local FHC to be read on a microfilm reader.  Many FHCs even have microfilm readers that will digitize your selected pages from the film to print or download onto a flashdrive.  Check the catalog for records you may need from the location your ancestors came.  Clicking on a film number will take you to an online ordering system.  Select the FHC you wish the film to arrive at, pay online using your credit card or PayPal, and you will receive emails notifying you of the status of your order.  Films generally cost $7.50 for postage and handling, and are available to be viewed at your local FHC for 6-8 weeks, depending on your location.  You can pay more to extend that time.  For me, ordering a $7.50 film from an out-of-state courthouse is worth the price.

2.  Resources galore at the library.  There are two types of libraries available from FamilySearch: the Family History Library (FHL) in Salt Lake and smaller local libraries known as Family History Centers, often located in part of an LDS meetinghouse.  The Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, is considered by many a genealogical mecca.  People travel there from all over, individually and in special groups, to have the opportunity to view all the films, books and indexes, and special collections, most of which are on site or can be ordered within a day or so.  One popular group research trip is organized by the National Genealogical Society twice a year. Free classes are available onsite at the FHL, separate from these group trips. There is still much available in your local FHC as well.  General how-to books, maps, magazines, and indexes featuring local history are available to patrons to view within each FHC.  Each FHC has an unique collection, depending on contributions or local needs.  There is an easy-to-use FHC finder on the FamilySearch website to direct you to the one closest to you.

3.  Helpful Volunteers.  While you cannot reasonably expect to find an expert on your particular genealogical conundrum at each local FHC, what you will find are people who are dedicated volunteers willing to help the best they can.  They can help familiarize you with the center, its holdings and hours, and the websites available for free online when you visit.  You don’t have to be a member of the LDS Church to volunteer yourself, you might consider donating a few hours a month to help out there too; ask the local FHC Director for more information.

4.  Online Access to Premium Sites.  Many premium online genealogy websites have generously donated access to their collections if you are using computers at the FHC and at the FHL.  Sites such as Ancestry.com, fold3, WorldVitalRecords.com, HistoricMapWorks, and NewspaperArchive.com are just some of the collections you can peruse while you visit.  The bonus is that those helpful volunteers often have experience with these sites and can assist you in person to familiarize yourself with those online collections.

5.  Best of all, its FREE!  People are always welcome in the Family History Centers, free of charge.  You need not expect proselytizing about the LDS church, the goal in the FHCs is to help you with your family history.  The only charges you might see are for the films, and those are generously low.  Now even copies are no charge in many local FHCs.

Perhaps a quote from Maya Angelou is appropriate here.  She said:

“We need to haunt the house of history and listen anew to the ancestors’ wisdom.” 

Perhaps the Family History Library and local Family History Centers are some of those tangible houses of history filled with valuable resources to genealogists of all levels. Visit one today and let us know of your experiences there! 

 

Your Genealogical Wish List for the Holidays

As much as we like to give during the holiday season – admit it – we like to receive too.  And as it is possible that the ones you love don’t quite understand how much you love working on your family history, you may just have to give yourself a genealogical gift this year.

What is your wish-list?  I will share mine, and perhaps it will give you some ideas for what you may need or gift ideas for our significant others.  Please know that the following are not endorsements for these products, just a few of my personal preferences.

  1. Subscriptions.  So many business are feeding our need for records.  I have a lot (don’t tell my husband!) of subscriptions to companies online including Ancestry, GenealogyBank, NewspaperArchive, and various genealogical societies whose websites offer more digitized records.  This year I’m planning to give myself a subscription to a new society, one I have been meaning to join.  Maybe it will be the Federation of Genealogical Societies or the Genealogical Speaker’s Guild.
  2. Conferences.  I could attend every genealogical conference in the country this year and still not be satisfied.  I love the feel of conferences, the commraderie, the vendors!  If I had to pick this year (and I really can’t), I think that I would enjoy the National Genealogical Society’s conference in May 2013.  On a personal note, it is located near some family and I could make the most of my visit by seeing them as well.  But let’s face it – its in VEGAS!  I am not a gambler at all, but I love the shows and the buffets.
  3. Books.  I think I would have to dedicate an entire website to the books I love on genealogy. I did an inventory once of all the books I have at Library Thing, but I had to stop once I reached 100 genealogy books, out of sheer exhaustion. Among my long list of published resources, one has been on my list for too long, and I think I just have to get it.  Its Joan L. Sevra’s Dressed for the Photographer: Ordinary Americans and Fashion, 1840 – 1900, available at many stores.
  4. Stories.  It is crucial to keep stories alive.  Names and dates are well and good, but where’s the personality?  Where’s the voice?  My gift to myself will be a way to pass the story along to my siblings, my children, and all my relatives.  I can start small right now by deciding which family I want to highlight, collecting their information, and then choosing a media that best suits my story.  Of course, a Reel Tributes documentary is my first choice!  Talk about giving my ancestors their voices back. For something quicker and less expensive, ReelGenie promises to be an amazing tool. If only it were ready for this holiday season!
  5. Time.  My family thinks I am crazy (for many reasons).   This is mostly because I think a valuable family vacation should be spent in a state and local archives in New York where my ancestors came from.  What’s wrong with having family time in the cemetery, or the court house?  So I think one thing I would really like is my own “vacation” to work on my family history.   I have taken some serious time this year writing about my ancestors.  Now I want to walk where they walked.  This year: New York.  Next year: Scotland!
  6. Answers.  I would like to ask a favor of the universe.  Please send me the names of my fifth great-grandfather’s parents.  I am stuck!  Have you felt this way?  I often say that I am the only person to prove my ancestors were actually dropped by aliens, because there is no other evidence to refute it.  In all seriousness, I have taken to keeping an 8×10 framed photo of great grandpa James Wescott Whitman (1794 – 1878) in my office to inspire me.  So, if the universe is listening, that’s what I want most of all.  More family.

What genealogical treats would you like in you holiday celebrations this year?  I’d love to hear your ideas.  Inspire us with what genealogical gifts you are giving to yourself.  The trick is that when you continue to search out and celebrate your family, it becomes a gift to everyone in your family.  Happy Holidays!