New Year’s Resolution: Back up Your Genealogical Data

One of the hardest things to face is a computer crash or other catastrophe that deletes all of the genealogical information you have saved on your home computer.  Genealogical databases, stories, digitized photos and documents, research logs, and proof arguments – all gone.

We should be backing up our information often, even monthly, but if you haven’t secured your information in some time, now is the time to do so, and to make a plan for regular backups this year.

You should plan to have copies of your most important family data both in your home, in case of a computer crash, and off-site, in case of fire in the home.  Backing up your data can be done in many ways.  You should pick the ones that best suit your needs.  Some ideas for backing up data are:

  • Re-writable CDs or flash-drives.  Copy your information onto a disc or flash-drive and label it by the date saved.  Check that the CD or flash-drive is capable of handling all the data you wish to save.  Store it in a safe place.  You may consider making a second copy and sending it to a family member to keep.
  • Upgrade your saved data to current software.  Do you have old floppy discs?  Can your current computer read those anymore? Probably not.  If your information is on a CD your computer can read, is the software out of date?  I know I have old Word Documents that won’t open any longer.  This is one of the reasons your data needs to be updated regularly – saving the data is no good if you can no longer access it.
  • Email Yourself.  One of the simplest ways to store small amounts of data is to attach the data in an email to yourself.  Unless your email account clears itself regularly, the data should be accessible for quite some time.  If you use genealogical software, it is easiest to email yourself a copy of the Gedcom file from your genealogical software.  You might email it to a family member as well, in case your email is inaccessible.
  • In the Cloud.  Many sites online offer private accounts where your data can be saved on the internet, and accessible anywhere you can get internet service.  Sites like DropBox  and JustCloud offer limited data storage space for free or for low monthly rates. More storage is available for higher fees.  Compare sites and ask friends about what they like and decide which may be best for you.
  • Dedicated Genealogical Websites.  Many sites like Ancestry.com and FamilySearch FamilyTree offer buildable online family trees. Some may cost you a yearly fee, others may be free.  To use these to best advantage, make sure you are sourcing all of your facts with citations and documenting all your attachments and photos.
  • Ask for Help.  Many of us are great researchers, but not so great at computers.  Saving data or investigating cloud sites just sounds like more than we can handle, but we do understand the importance of backing up our information.  Ask for help, you may have friends or family members who can help with the technical end of information storage while you concentrate on the research.

Start the year off by breathing a sigh of relief that your data is safer than it was last year.  Schedule regular back-up dates throughout the year, and when that fateful “blue screen of death” comes to your computer, you’ll be ready.  Happy New Year!