The Blog

Happy New Year from your friends at Reel Tributes!

To all of our Jewish fans, we wish you a new year full of milk and honey, happiness and prosperity, and even stronger bonds with your loved ones. Rosh Hashanah is a time of reflecting on the past and and contemplating the future.  Take a few minutes to ask your family about their favorite memories, and what they wish for in the years to come.

Shana tova!

– The Reel Tributes team

 

Photo credit: http://blogcritics.org/

The Thanksgiving Feast: Food, family, and the future

Thanksgiving brings back plenty of fond memories: visiting with family, watching the Macy’s Day Parade on Thanksgiving morning, and playing football in the afternoon. And of course, everyone’s favorite:  eating the meal of all meals.  We all have our favorites – whether it is a honey roasted spiral cut ham or a Butterball Turkey.  Undoubtedly there will be a myriad of other dishes on the table as well.

Some of my favorites are my mother’s creamed pearl onions. Heavenly! It just wouldn’t be Thanksgiving unless those creamed onions were there at our feast. My two daughters wouldn’t be happy unless I have made my sweet potato casserole and huge tray of stuffed deviled eggs. My husband has a favorite, too. There must be a platter of asparagus with Hollandaise sauce on his side of the Thanksgiving table.

Did your mother or grandmother have special recipes that were unique to them? Here’s a sweet-tasting thought: Thanksgiving is a great time to put together a cookbook of family heirloom recipes so that these special delights will never be missing from your family’s Thanksgiving table.

Here’s mine, Lin’s Sweet Potato Casserole:
Cut six medium sweet potatoes, cooked and peeled, in ½-inch slices. Layer potatoes in buttered  1 ½ quart casserole with ¾ cup brown sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, and ¼ cup butter, ending with sugar and butter.  Bake uncovered at 375 degrees about 30 minutes or till glazed.  Add ½ cup miniature marshmallows last five minutes; brown lightly.  Serves 6.

If you make it, let us know how it turns out.  Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at Reel Tributes!

How Will You Celebrate the National Day of Listening?

Did you know that the day after Turkey Day is another holiday? Most people don’t know, but we’re here to let you in on a little (but big) secret, so listen up.

Friday, November 25, 2011 is the National Day of Listening. It is considered an “unofficial day of observance.” Americans are encouraged to record the stories of their families, friends, and local communities.  This special day was first launched by the national oral history project StoryCorps in 2008, to be a day set aside for reminiscing, story sharing and creating new memories. So while you’re recovering from the food coma and helping yourself to leftovers, bring the family together for some storytelling. Don’t know where to start? Our friends at AARP have put together a great list of “Story Starters” to give you a helping hand.

For more information about the National Day of Listening, please check out:
http://www.npr.org/series/120540199/storycorps-national-day-of-listening
or http://www.storycorps.org

Photo credit: AARP (Gary Hovland)

Happiness: The Family Experience

Ask anyone what they want most of out of life, and chances are he or she will reply: “to be happy.” But what exactly makes people happy, and how can you get the most happiness out of life? If you abide by the age-old adage, “money can’t buy happiness,” you may be missing a fine distinction: spending your money in different ways may bring you varying degrees of happiness.

Imagine that you have an extra hundred dollars to spend and want to treat yourself to something special. Scientific research offers you the following advice on how to spend it: choose an experiential purchase rather than a material one. In a 2003 paper on this topic, experiential purchases were defined as “those made with the primary intention of acquiring a life experience: an event or series of events that one lives through.” Meanwhile, material purchases were defined as “those made with the primary intention of acquiring a material good: a tangible object that is kept in one’s possession.” Examples of experiential purchases include family vacations, massages, or tickets to a baseball game. Material purchases, on the other hand, include clothing, an iPad, or a sleek new car.

Another recent study demonstrated that compared with material purchases, experiential purchases make people happier both in the immediate term as well as after the experience has passed, leading to longer-term happiness. Though evidence is mounting that experiences are more satisfying than material possessions, scientists are still investigating why this is the case. One possible reason, suggested by the work of Travis Carter and Thomas Gilovich,  is that experiences cannot be compared like material possessions, and because of that, the satisfaction you get from an experience is more robust. Think of it this way: it’s easy to compare two expensive watches, but it’s far more difficult to compare vacations in two exotic locations. In addition, the scientists found that people have more difficulty making material versus experiential purchase decisions, and that people also tend to second-guess and ruminate over material purchases more than experiential ones.

Happiness research can be applied to everything from public policy to psychotherapy to the choices we make in everyday life. The next time you are faced with the option of splurging on an experience or a possession, consider that an experience may not only make you happier, but can also bring happiness to the people you share it with.

That is why we at Reel Tributes believe so strongly in what we do. A family history documentary is a genuine life experience and an investment for the whole family. It is a purchase that allows you to preserve lasting memories, strengthen family bonds, and create long-term joy that a new toy simply can’t provide.  In the words of one client:

We staged a “premiere” of Nana’s tribute movie at her 90th birthday party to over 100 friends and family.  At the conclusion of the movie there wasn’t a dry eye in the room.  It has been over 2 months since the big unveiling and the family is still raving about how much they learned about Nana from the video that they never would have otherwise….The overall consensus is that Nana’s Reel Tributes Video was an invaluable gift to our family. 

If you’re looking for long-term happiness, think about what’s most important in your life. Most likely, it’s not the material possessions you own. Experiences and family bonding: the two sources of happiness that will stick with you and your loved ones.