The Blog

Highlights and Headaches of Using Lineage Applications

What’s a Lineage Application?  People apply to join societies based on their link to an ancestor who was involved in a specific historical event or heritage.  When doing so, the applicant must supply a personal genealogy, generation by generation, to prove their link between themselves and the ancestor.  Examples of lineage societies include:

National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution

- General Society of Mayflower Descendants

- General Society of the War of 1812

- Colonial Dames

- Order of Founders and Patriots of America

And more… check out Cyndi’s List for links to many of these.

Shared Ancestor?  Many of these societies have existed for generations, and hold genealogical gems of information in their lineage paperwork.  For a fee, or sometimes for free if you are onsite at their national headquarters, some of these societies will allow you to peruse past lineage applications, including proofs and documents related to them (generally not including those that contain information on living people).  If you share an ancestor with someone who applied for membership in one of these societies, the information and documents in their file could be of great use to you!

The Headaches.  With great patriotic zeal, many of our grandmothers and grandfathers flocked to join historically-based lineage societies, especially in the early 1900s.  Sometimes, unfortunately, the documents to prove relationships have been destroyed or lost.  Occasionally, the information is completely wrong.  Take these for example:

– In an application filed in 1933, the descendant identified her ancestor’s wife, date of marriage, five children, unit served in during that war, age and birthplace, and death date.  No documentation was attached except a letter from the War Department identifying the man’s service unit.  In researching the man, it was discovered that of the information provided his wife was correct, the date of marriage was off by five years, the service unit was wrong (two men of the same name served from that state), three children were missing from the list, the death date was right, the birth county was wrong but not the state, and the man’s birth year was off by twenty years!

– In an application filed in the late 1920s, a descendant identified the ancestor as a Colonel in the army, gave his wife’s name, children’s names, birth year, and birth state, and state served from.  The research concluded that the wife, children, and birth year and state were correct.  However, the birth year showed that the man was only age 11 at the beginning of the war, not likely to be officer material.  The original application was denied.  The application was resubmitted, but next identified the ancestor as a private in the army.  Further research concluded that while it is possible that the man could have joined late in the war as a drummer or boy soldier, he would not have matched the man he was identified as.  The problem was that the ancestor had a common name, and there were nine men of that name from that state who served in the war.  Eventually a newspaper from the late 1920s for the descendant’s home town was found with an article about the descendant and her patriotic ancestor.  The descendant was quoted as saying that they had no idea if the ancestor served, but he lived during that time, so he probably did.  The research unfortunately concluded that the ancestor did not serve at all and was not even living in the state he was to have served in during the war.

The Highlights.  While some early applications have errors, these days national lineage societies are very careful about checking and re-checking the veracity of the applications submitted to them.  They often employ talented professionals who review current applications and often re-review older applications.  I have found some amazing personal documents in lineage applications that either were a short cut in my research or were so unique as to not be found elsewhere, such as:

– Handwritten copies of marriage licenses

– Copies of Family Bible pages

– Names of Children who pre-deceased vital registrations

– Information on family migrations

– Church records, such as baptisms or funerals.

How To Get the Best Out of Lineage Applications.  In any research where you find a genealogy with lots of great information but little to no documentation, don’t discard it out of hand – use it as a backdrop to your future research.  In the first example of the application filed in 1933, the marriage date was wrong, but the city was not.  Having that to start from was a short cut – otherwise the research would have had to stretch to three possible counties.  Some clues in the children’s names helped narrow down information on their marriages, and it turned out they were married in the same church as their parents.  This led not only to the correct marriage date but also to finding the cemetery plot records.  Without that lineage application, the research would have taken much more time.  The key is to not just accept names, dates, and places in the application at face value.  Chase it down –  find the original record!  You may find more than you thought.

Thank You Lineage Societies!  While we may find good or bad in lineage application records, we thank these societies for keeping history alive through the generations.  Many society members spend volunteer hours in preserving documents, indexing records, identifying and beautifying cemeteries, or giving back to the community in other ways.  Societies such as these often promote genealogical research and collect books and microfilms on historical subjects in libraries that are open to the public.  Take time to find out if you have a great aunt or grandfather who joined one of these societies and check out the research they did to honor your common ancestor.

Happy Hunting!