The Blog

Scary Superstitions

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With Halloween approaching, it got me thinking about death. I’m probably not alone. Have you ever wondered why a woman wears black while in mourning?  Or why people stopped the clocks after a family member died?  Or what the different symbols mean in cemetery art?  Or how your ancestors mourned the passing of their friends and family?

Death is a part of our lives, but had much more of a presence in the lives of our ancestors when we consider mortality rates and the shorter life-spans of some of our earlier relatives.   To better understand our ancestors, and the culture of death they lived with, try a few of these little genealogical exercises.  We may end up exorcising our own ignorance about death and funeral traditions among our dearly departed:

Read.  Some of my favorites at this time of year are -

Surf the Web.  Lots of information is available online, here’s some to get you started -

Experience:  Get out and have some spooky fun, or help make records more available for others -

  • Take photos of headstones at a local cemetery and upload them at FindaGrave.com or Interment.net
  • I am my own great-grandmother?  If you’ve got the time and are making a costume, how about a little genealogical cosplay?  Make a historical costume based on an ancestor’s time or heritage.
  • Rescue a cemetery.  So many cemeteries in our communities are being lost to neglect and swallowed up by nature.  It will take time and organization, but you may want to get together with a local historical or genealogical group to clean up a “forgotten” cemetery.

Remember.  As always, a ghost story is fun, but a life story is what genealogy and family history is all about.  Find a way to remember your ancestors in scrapbooks, narratives, or video.  Just remember and appreciate.